General Information
Finance Director
Richard Balmer
Phone Numbers
919-575-3367
Fax: 919-575-4547
Emergencies: Dial 911
Location
415 Central Avenue
Suite B
Butner,
NC
27509

Hours
Bill Pay Lobby
9:00am- 4:00pm Monday thru Friday
Business Office Hours
8:30am - 4:30pm Monday thru Friday

Customer Service News

Bill Payment Lobby and Business Office To Open at 10:00am on 1/21/22 Due to Inclement Weather Forecast.


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Butner, NC. January 20, 2022 (7:00 pm) —  Due to the forecasted severe weather event moving through the area overnight tonight bringing temperatures below freezing and the threat of hazardous roadway and pedestrian conditions in the morning, SGWASA's bill payment lobby and business office will delay opening until at 10:00am on 1/21/22. Doing so provides utility customers a greater potential for safer conditions if/when traveling throughout the local area.

*** Further operational delays may be necessary if the severe weather conditions continue into the late morning. 


Please stay up to date on this topic and other news topics by monitoring our website at www.sgwasa.org 

Issued 1/20/22 by the South Granville Water and Sewer Authority
Scott N. Schroyer, Executive Director
919-575-3367 

customerservice@sgwasa.org



SGWASA’s utility crew completes emergency water main break repairs on W. F Street between 12th Street & 13th Street in Butner without water disruption to customers.


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Butner, NC January 20, 2022 (7:00 pm) – At 5:00 pm  today, SGWASA’s utility crew responded to 503 W F Street (between 12th Street & 13th Street) in Butner to repair a weather-related water main break. The utility crew was able to complete the necessary repairs to the broken water main quickly without disrupting service to utility customers.    

See the information below to read more about what causes water main breaks to occur. 





Please stay up to date on this topic and other news topics by monitoring our website at www.sgwasa.org 

Issued 1/20/22 by the South Granville Water and Sewer Authority

Scott N. Schroyer, Executive Director
919-575-3367

customerservice@sgwasa.org

 


When a water main breaks in your area.

When a water main breaks in your area, there are certain steps you should take in order to protect you, your family and your plumbing system from potential damage and contaminates. Here is a breakdown of water mains are, how they break and what you need to do during and after repairs.

What is a water main break?

A water main is an underground pipe that carries water from your area’s water source to your service pipe. These pipes usually run under the streets and sidewalks.

A water main break occurs when a hole or crack in the pipe causes water to move to the surface. Pressure in the water main causes water to continuously flow, so when a leak occurs, water will continuously run until the issue is fixed.

What causes water main breaks?

Water main breaks are caused by a combination of the ground temperature and the water temperature. Sudden changes in temperature will cause the ground to contract (when it’s cold) or expand (when it’s hot). This changing pressure on the pipes will create a hole or crack at weak points in the main. Water will then leak from this crack.

How are water main breaks fixed?

As soon as the problem is reported and inspected, the affected area is blocked off if there is damage to the road or sidewalk. The pipe is then excavated and the water re-routed to minimize service disruption. The water main is then repaired and the road and/or sidewalk put back together.

From the beginning of repair to the end takes about 6-8 hours.

What to do if a water main breaks

If a water main breaks in your area, your first step should be to contact your local water department to report the issue. You should also limit your water use until the repair is complete.

Boil Water Orders

Also pay attention to any water boil warnings. The water department will issue these warnings if there is concern of any contaminates in the water. Dirt and debris from the area surrounding the pipe may enter the water.

If you are placed under a water boil warning, bring water to a rolling boil for at least 1 minute before drinking, brushing your teeth, or cooking. Otherwise,  the water is safe for showering, cleaning, and doing laundry – as long as it’s not ingested.


Do You Know How To Access SGWASA’s Archive Folder To Review Board Meeting Minutes, Agenda’s, and Meeting Materials? If Not, Then Learn How To Here.


Background

SGWASA’s website provides an Archive allowing you to review Board Meeting materials from 2005 to the present.  These Board Meeting materials include Minutes, Agendas, and other presentation materials.  Meeting materials from the most recent Board Meeting are posted within 3-5 days of the meeting.  Beginning in April 2020 you can access SGWASA audio and video meeting recordings, as this is when SGWASA initiated regular audio/video meeting recordings.   

Instructions for Accessing the Archive Folder 

1. To access the Archive folder on the SGWASA website, please visit the SGWASA website home page at www.sgwasa.org, then look for the Archive folder icon on the middle of the home page, to the far right. 


2. Once you select the Archive folder you will see folders listed by calendar year (see below). Select the desired folder, such as 2022. When the folder opens (see step 3 below), you will see a selection of Board Meeting dates. Choose one of the meeting dates to examine the information contained within the folder.


3. The selected meeting date shows the information related to the meeting. Select an item by clicking on it. Once the item is opened, you can view it and download it. To view a video file you must have a video player on your computer. 

 




Please stay up to date on this topic and other news topics by monitoring our website at www.sgwasa.org 

Issued 1/18/22 by the South Granville Water and Sewer Authority
 Scott N. Schroyer, Executive Director
 919-575-3367
 
customerservice@sgwasa.org



SGWASA Continues to Meet NC Drinking Water Standards for Disinfection-By-Products.


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Butner, NC. January 18, 2022  — As the 2021 4th quarter report shows,  SGWASA continues to achieve success in meeting the North Carolina Drinking Water Standards for Disinfection By Products (DBP), marking 4 years without a DBP violation, and being among the best in the area in terms of DBP results.

Jimmy Gooch, SGWASA Board Chairman commented, “Congratulations to SGWASA Executive Director Scott Schroyer, Utilities Operations Director Fred Dancy and the dedicated SGWASA water treatment facility employees for once again achieving success in meeting the North Carolina Drinking Water Standards for Disinfection By Products (DBP).”

SGWASA Executive Director Schroyer commented, “Consistently achieving low values quarterly for the past four years to be in compliance with the EPA is excellent in terms of SGWASA providing quality drinking water to its customers.”

To give our customers an idea of how SGWASA rates with others in our area, below are the most recent quarterly compliance test results. These results are compiled from the NC Drinking Water Watch website (https://deq.nc.gov/about/divisions/water-resources/drinking-water/drinking-water-watch).

  

 TTHM's 
Locational Running Annual Average 
HAA5's
 Locational Running Annual Average
AgencyMaximum Contaminant Level Allowed (MG/L)

2021 

4th Quarter Value (MG/L)

Maximum Contaminant Level Allowed (MG/L)

2021 

4th Quarter Value (MG/L)

SGWASA0.0800.0290.0600.023
City of Oxford0.080N/A0.060N/A
Henderson - Kerr Lake Regional 0.0800.0510.0600.041
City of Durham0.0800.0330.0600.027
Hillsborough 0.0800.0410.0600.031
OWASA0.0800.0120.0600.006

MG/L = Milligrams per Liter


What are DBP’s and TTHM’s?

DBP’s: Disinfection by-products (DBPs), also called trihalomethanes, are formed when chlorine and bromine interact with natural organic materials in water, such as in chlorinated drinking water and chlorine-treated swimming pools. DBPs can be found in the air during activities such as showering, bathing, dishwashing, and swimming. DBPs do not build up in the environment.

TTHM's: Trihalomethanes (THM) are a group of four chemicals that are formed along with other disinfection by products when chlorine or other disinfectants used to control microbial contaminants in drinking water react with naturally occurring organic and inorganic matter in water.  The EPA regulates total trihalomethanes at a maximum allowable annual average level of 80 parts per billion (0.080 MG/L).

Locational Running Annual Average: These values represent the four most recent quarters of data reported. 


Please stay up to date on this topic and other news topics by monitoring our website: www.sgwasa.org 

Issued: 1/18/22 by the South Granville Water and Sewer Authority
 Scott N. Schroyer, Executive Director
 919-575-3367 


American Red Cross Blood Drive will be held on February 22, 2022


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Butner, NC January 14, 2022 (12:00 pm) – In support of our local communities, SGWASA urges those who can, to participate in the American Red Cross Blood Drive being held on February 22, 2022 from 12:30 pm to 4:30 pm at the following two locations. 

  • Butner Town Hall (415 Central Ave. Butner, NC 27509)
  • Oxford Public Works Building (127 Penn Ave. Oxford NC 27565)
Please  Blood Drive and Children Donations Flyer  for more information.



Please stay up to date on this topic and other news topics by monitoring our website at www.sgwasa.org 

Issued 1/142/22 by the South Granville Water and Sewer Authority
 
Scott N. Schroyer, Executive Director
 
919-575-3367

 customerservice@sgwasa.org


SGWASA Sets Milestone With The Adoption Of First-Ever Strategic Plan  


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Butner, NC January 7, 2022 - In September 2021, SGWASA marked a milestone with the adoption of the Utility’s first-ever formal Strategic Plan.  The Strategic Plan guides the South Granville Water and Sewer Authority (SGWASA) as it responds to the evolving utility needs of its stakeholders.  SGWASA’s five-year Strategic Plan points the way toward improving the qualities to make SGWASA an outstanding utility. The Strategic Plan articulates areas of strategic focus which target the Utility’s efforts and resources in ways intended to have the greatest impact in the four key focus areas over the life of the Strategic Plan.

The purpose of the Strategic Plan is to create a shared vision throughout the Utility and to align its efforts to achieve the mission and long-term goals.  The shared vision enables all employees to understand the Utility’s destination – “To be a superior utility service provider that contributes to the success of the region.”  The alignment of Utility’s resources enables employees to understand the actions required to achieve this standard.  These actions are derived from the Objectives contained in this plan, which support the Strategies, Long Term Goals and Mission.    

Click on the following link to see the new webpage dedicated to the Strategic Plan.  

Strategic Plan Home Page


Please stay up to date on this topic and other news topics by monitoring our website at www.sgwasa.org 

Issued 1/7/22 by the South Granville Water and Sewer Authority
Scott N. Schroyer, Executive Director
919-575-3367
customerservice@sgwasa.org

   



Protect yourself from unexpectedly high bills due to water leaks


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Butner, NC, December 20, 2021 — Attention SGWASA Utility Customers: The South Granville Water and Sewer Authority (SGWASA) customer service team has recently noticed an uptick in customers experiencing high water bills due to water leaks either in their home/business or on their water service line. Many people don’t realize just how big of an impact a leak can have. SGWASA wants to help customers understand how, and what to look for, to prevent unexpectedly high bills due to leaks.

Are you ready to chase down leaks? Household leaks can waste nearly 1 trillion gallons of water annually nationwide but remember that you can find and fix leaks inside and outside your home to save valuable water and money all year long.

Checking for Leaks

The average household's leaks can account for nearly 10,000 gallons of water wasted every year and ten percent of homes have leaks that waste 90 gallons or more per day. Common types of leaks found in the home are worn toilet flappers, dripping faucets, and other leaking valves. These types of leaks are often easy to fix, requiring only a few tools and hardware that can pay for themselves in water savings. Fixing easily corrected household water leaks can save homeowners about 10 percent on their water bills.

To check for leaks in your home, you first need to determine whether you're wasting water and then identify the source of the leak. Here are some tips for finding leaks:

  • Take a look at your water usage during a colder month, such as January or February. If a family of four exceeds 12,000 gallons per month, there are serious leaks.
  • Identify toilet leaks by placing a drop of food coloring in the toilet tank. If any color shows up in the bowl after 10 minutes, you have a leak. (Be sure to flush immediately after the experiment to avoid staining the tank.)
  • Examine faucet gaskets and pipe fittings for any water on the outside of the pipe to check for surface leaks.
  • The EPA has numerous resources, videos, guides, and a leak checklist at: epa.gov/watersense


Toilet Leaks

Old or worn-out toilet flappers (e.g., valve seal) can cause leaks. Flappers are inexpensive rubber parts that can build up minerals or decay over time. Replacing them can be a quick and easy fix for your water woes. To fix this leak, consult your local hardware store, home improvement retailer, or licensed plumber.  

Tip: Bring the old flapper to the hardware store for comparison to make sure you buy a new flapper that fits your toilet model. You can also check the owner's manual, if you have it, or the manufacturer's website for the appropriate replacement part number for the flapper.

Faucet Leaks

Old and worn faucet washers and gaskets frequently cause leaks in faucets. A leaky faucet that drips at the rate of one drip per second can waste more than 3,000 gallons per year. That's the amount of water needed to take more than 180 showers!

Showerhead Leaks

A showerhead leaking at 10 drips per minute wastes more than 500 gallons per year. That's the amount of water it takes to wash 60 loads of dishes in your dishwasher. Some leaky showerheads can be fixed by making sure there is a tight connection between the showerhead and the pipe stem and by using pipe tape to secure it. 

Outdoor Leaks

If you have an in-ground irrigation system, check it each spring before use to make sure it wasn’t damaged by frost or freezing. An irrigation system that has a leak 1/32nd of an inch in diameter (about the thickness of a dime) can waste about 6,300 gallons of water per month. 

Tip:  Don't forget garden hoses!  Check your garden hose for leaks at its connection to the spigot. If it leaks while you run your hose, replace the nylon or rubber hose washer and ensure a tight connection to the spigot using pipe tape and a wrench.   Never leave outdoor water faucets on when not in use.  Garden hoses can easily burst causing significant water loss.


Who’s Responsible for the Water Service Line and Leaks?   The water service line brings water to your home. The water service line that runs from the water meter, normally found at the property line, to the home or place of business is the property owner’s responsibility to maintain.  SGWASA is responsible for maintaining and fixing the pipes that go from the property line (meter box) to SGWASA’s water main.  

 

If a leak is discovered and fixed and that leak resulted in a high water bill, please see our website and Leak Adjustment Form for information on a possible leak adjustment.  Adjustments are not available for some types of leaks. For more information, visit sgwasa.org/waterleaks


SGWASA Participates With North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services In New Program To Help Families Pay Water Bills.


Butner, NC — SGWASA is participating with the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (NCDHHS) to provide financial assistance for households affected by the Covid-19 pandemic. 


The North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services (NCDHHS) recently announced a new program, known as the Low Income Household Water Assistance Program (LIHWAP), to provide financial assistance to eligible households that had their water service turned off, or received notification that their water service might be turned off.  


The program provides a one-time payment for eligible households. The program will run through September 2023 or until funds run out, according to NCDHHS. 


This program is managed by NCDHHS, not SGWASA.  


To safely and better serve our customers who need assistance, apply online at https://epass.nc.gov/. Other ways to apply are over the phone by calling (919) 693-1511, mail in application to Granville County Department of Social Services, 410 West Spring Street in Oxford, fax application to (919) 693-5090, or drop off the application in our secure drop box available to you at any time.  

 


Please stay up to date on this topic and other news topics by monitoring our website at www.sgwasa.org

Updated 1/12/22 by the South Granville Water and Sewer Authority
Scott N. Schroyer, Executive Director
919-575-3367

customerservice@sgwasa.org